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Home > Auctions > 6th September 2022 > 'The Kirkby Lonsdale' Brigantes Celtic Horse Harness Union with Hidden Faces

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LOT 0376

Estimate
GBP (£) 2,000 - 3,000
EUR (€) 2,390 - 3,590
USD ($) 2,440 - 3,650

Opening Bid
£1,800 (EUR 2,152; USD 2,193) (+bp*)

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Bid History: 0
'THE KIRKBY LONSDALE' BRIGANTES CELTIC HORSE HARNESS UNION WITH HIDDEN FACES
1ST CENTURY B.C.-1ST CENTURY A.D.

A substantial bronze harness fitting composed of circular body with deliberate asymmetrical central openwork La Tène oval and tear-shapes forming three 'hidden faces' comprising of a human face and two side profile puffin-like faces, red enamelled border, strap arm to each side composed of two circular arms with a round-section bar between. 2 3/4 in. (51.2 grams, 71 mm).

PROVENANCE:
Found whilst searching with a metal detector near Kirkby Lonsdale, Cumbria, UK, on Tuesday 10th May 2022.
Accompanied by a copy of the book British Artefacts Volume 4 - The Celtic Iron Age, when published.
This lot has been checked against the Interpol Database of stolen works of art and is accompanied by AIAD certificate no.11403-190465.

PUBLISHED:
Hammond, Brett, British Artefacts Volume 4 - The Celtic Iron Age, Greenlight publishing, 2022, (forthcoming) for this example.

LITERATURE:
Cf. The Trustees of The British Museum., Later Prehistoric Antiquities Of The British Isles, London, 1953, pl. XI, for comparable forms; cf. Jope, E.M., Early Celtic Art In The British Isles, Oxford, 2000, pl.276, for similar types; and Hammond, A., Benet's Artefacts of England and the United Kingdom, 4th edition, 2021, p.122-124, for several much smaller examples.

FOOTNOTES:
The Brigantes were a tribe, or perhaps more accurately a loose confederation of related tribes, of British Celts inhabiting most of the area between the Humber and the Tyne. The name of the tribe originates from the Celtic goddess Brigantia.

CONDITION