Choose Category:

Home > Auctions > 29th November 2022 > Medieval Limewood Figure of St John from the Workshop of Tilman Riemenschneider

Print page | Email lot to a friend

Back to previous page


Use mousewheel to zoom in and out, click to enlarge
Gallery loading...

LOT 0361

Estimate
GBP (£) 4,000 - 6,000
EUR (€) 4,660 - 7,000
USD ($) 4,910 - 7,370

Sold for (Inc. bp): £7,800

7

MEDIEVAL LIMEWOOD FIGURE OF ST JOHN FROM THE WORKSHOP OF TILMAN RIEMENSCHNEIDER
FRANCONIA, LATE 15TH-EARLY 16TH CENTURY A.D.
38 3/4 in. (5.45 kg, 98.5 cm high).

A carved limewood figure of St John from the workshop of Tilman Riemenschneider in Würzburg, Germany; the saint standing with his head slightly tilted, a mop of curled hair surrounding his doleful face; a long mantle draped over his sleeved tunic, his bare feet placed on a knoll with textured grass and stones; holding a Gospel in his left hand. [No Reserve]

PROVENANCE:
French private collection.
Accompanied by an academic report by Dr Raffaele D’Amato.
This lot has been checked against the Interpol Database of stolen works of art and is accompanied by search certificate no.114460-196260.

LITERATURE:
See Tönnies, E., Leben und Werke des Würzburger Bildschnitzers Tilman Riemenschneider, 1468-1531, Strassburg, 1900; Gόmez-Moreno, C., Medieval Art, from private collections, a special exhibition at the Closters, October 30, 1968, through March 30, 1969, New York, 1968; Bier, J., Tilman Riemenschneider: His life and Work, Lexington, 1982; Chapuis, J., Tilman Riemenschneider: Master Sculptor of the Late Middle Ages, National Gallery London Publications, 1999; late Gothic wooden statues of St John the Evangelist from a crucifixion in Dáňová, H. and Pražáková, M. (eds.), In the middle of the Czech Crown - Gothic and Early Renaissance Art of Eastern Bohemia 1250—1550, (in Czech), Muzeum východních Čech v Hradci Králové, 2020, pp.142-143, 177.

FOOTNOTES:
Tilman Riemenschneider was a prolific sculptor in stone and in limewood, whose work is held to mark the transition from the late medieval 'Gothic' style to the more naturalistic Renaissance style. From circa 1520, his increasing involvement in local government and politics entailed handing over much of his commission work to his apprentices and workshop. His work is unusual for its deep modelling of folds in clothing and in that it was not always painted. This statue was possibly part of a carving group representing the Crucifixion.

The timber shows some old insect flight holes and we are advised that this piece has been recently treated with Permethrin, as a precaution.

CONDITION