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Home > Auctions > 25th May 2021 > Egyptian Granite Head of a Priest

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LOT 0505

Estimate
GBP (£) 1,200 - 1,700
EUR (€) 1,390 - 1,970
USD ($) 1,670 - 2,360

Bid History: 4   |   Current bid: £15

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Bid History: 4   |   Current bid: £15

Egyptian Granite Head of a Priest

Probably late 25th Dynasty, 747-656 BC

A naturalistically carved black granite head of a priest with clean-shaven head and solemn expression; elongated small eyes with well-defined eyelids, wide nose, subtle ridge of flesh on each cheek, known as the Kushite fold, soft, rounded lips; inked collection number '79' to the reverse; mounted on a custom-made display stand. 2.7 kg total, 19.5cm including stand (7 3/4"). Fine condition. [No Reserve]

Provenance
From the private collection of a New York collector; part of his family collection since at least the early 1970s; thence by descent from his grandfather in 1975; accompanied by an academic report by Egyptologist Dr Alberto Pollastrini.

Literature
See The Walters Art Museum, accession number 22.358, for a similar example; see also Fazzini, R., Images for Eternity, Egyptian Art from Berkeley and Brooklyn, New York, 1975, cat. 104a, p.121; Bothmer, B.V. et al., Egyptian Sculpture of the Late Period 700 B.C. to A.D. 100, 1960, Brooklyn, The Brooklyn Museum.

Footnotes
With the exception of its size, this sculpture bears stylistic resemblance to the statue of the High Priest of Amun Horemakhet, son of pharaoh Shabaka, dating from the early part of Dynasty XXV (Aswan, the Nubian Museum, CGC42204, ALDRED 1980, p. 144), and to the statue of Vizier Nespamedu, son of Nespakashuty, dating from the end of Dynasty XXV to the early part of Dynasty XXVI (Cairo Museum CGC48608/JE37416, Josephson and Eldamaty, 1999, p. 16-19 1963; De Meulenaere, 1963, p. 74). Both of these comparable examples originated from the Karnak Cachette, and were likely produced at the same workshop.